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IT’S COMIIIING!!! :D

*Edit: For some reason the thumbnails all have wildly inaccurate colors…why?!? If you know, advise me please!

*Double Edit: Uhhh…Tumblr? Where did my pictures go??

angergirl:

This might make no sense and be absolutely flawed, sorry, but here we go.

Now, I love Barbara Gordon as a character. I love her as Batgirl and I love her as Oracle. She’s fascinating, particularly because as Oracle she was able to stare down Batman and win. She could subvert…

Breaking Bad to the Future — Fighting Art Plagiarism: (PLEASE re-blog and share)
Signal boost for an artist I know whose fan art concept was plagiarized by another “artist” for profit…

m-v-b:

( Edit: He FB messaged me the following AFTER I wrote the body of this post. )

image

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I know I don’t own Back to the Future parodies, or Breaking Bad parodies, or mash-ups - and my own piece was a (rather obvious) homage to Drew Struzan, a poster artist whom I greatly admire… but I credited him as my inspiration from the start, and I didn’t simply copy his image, I put my own spin on it. It was my idea to make THIS homage. I hunted high and low for anyone who had executed a similar mash-up in the past before I started work on it. A few people had done Breaking Bad/BttF mash-ups, but as far as I could tell, no one had done it this way before me. 

The day after I posted my initial rough sketch, Jamie R. Stone (AKA: Punksthetic) rushed his own into production, posting progress images in the same manner I had (something that doesn’t appear to be part of his regular practice). He finished his the day after I finished mine, and promptly started selling it on Redbubble. 

The problem here is that Jamie making money from my idea really does effect me. It potentially affects my sales, because people who see his first may buy it, or they may choose his over mine. It’s already hard enough to make money out of art without competing with the people who are stealing your ideas. That’s why y
esterday I posted this sardonic open-letter to Redbubble (written in the style of Walter White), pleading with them to remove a knock-off of my own work from their website. They did. I’m happy for that. I’ve put up t-shirts of my own work there now for people to buy if they’re interested. 

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However, unfortunately, I’m still dealing with this problem, because the plagiarist (Jamie R. Stone, AKA; Punksthetic) has not guaranteed that he will remove his version from sale elsewhere. 

Yesterday we had a long argument on his Facebook Fan-Page, (during which he had the audacity to ask me for a share of my own profits) where many decent people defended me - and one of his friends attempted to defend him. The only real defense was essentially; ‘Jamie isn’t a plagiarist, he’s a nice guy!’ Eventually, they gave up, deleted all negative comments about them, and Jamie’s friend posted something insinuating that we had arrived at some sort of a mutual agreement.

We had not. Neither Jamie, nor his solitary supporter have made themselves available for comment. To reiterate, they have told people we have come to an agreement and blocked me from telling people that this isn’t true. 

I’m asking anybody out there who sees this and disagrees with stealing other people’s concepts, to contact Jamie via his Facebook, his Facebook fan-page, or his Tumblr and ask him to please take his shameless copy down and cease attempting to sell it.  

And please, if you see him selling this piece elsewhere on the internet, let me know.

Thanks for your time, love you guys.

EDIT: Since I first posted this, he has admitted to stealing my idea and threatened me: image

So it doesn’t seem like he’s backing down. I do appreciate all of your attempts to get through to him though, especially those of you posting on his fan-page about the theft. 

I’ve been talking to other artist who have brought to light other knock-offs he has made. This guy is a regular crook, making a living out of stealing concepts from better artists and selling inferior work on t-shirt sites. 

Example

Original: http://www.redbubble.com/people/bamboota/works/9169808-leonardo-leads

Jamie’s Knock-Off: http://www.redbubble.com/people/punksthetic/works/10802795-bone-to-lead-leonardo

Please, make a note of this man’s name and do not buy from him. Tell your friends not to buy from him. Share this post around as much as possible and let people know that he isn’t worth their money. 

Thanks again.

-MVB

P.S: Below is a long transcript of deleted content from Jamie’s FB fanpage with much proof and very telling behaviour on his side. 

THE FACEBOOK TRANSCRIPT:

Read More

eschergirls:

fatpeopleart:

nepputune:

So I’ve seen a whole bunch of posts about body positivity. And it would be great, but they’re really bad at actually representing different body types; big girls in particular. So I’ve drawn a comparison.
I’m tired of seeing posts that totally miss the point. Those posts are supposed to make you feel good about your body. But it’s hard for bigger girls to feel good about themselves if they’re represented by women that aren’t big. Fat is okay. But here’s some things that people almost always ignore when drawing bigger ladies:
- Rolls
- Cellulite
- Stretch marks
And some misconceptions/ common mistakes:
- Larger breasts ( a LOT larger) 
- Wider hips
- Same size waist as girls with less body fat
I’m going to put it bluntly: I’m sick of seeing fatter girls be misrepresented. I’m tired of seeing posts getting glory for drawing bigger girls when they don’t. I have yet to see a body positivity post that shows cellulite, stretch marks, folds, and spillage. These things are real, and they’re beautiful.
So try and remember these things next time you try and represent fat girls. Because if you’re not thinking about the “ugly” stuff, you’re doing it wrong.

This is something I think a lot about when I moderate this blog. We get a lot of submissions depicting fat people who aren’t really… well, fat.
Fatter than what we see in a lot of art, sure. And I know for a lot of the artists submitting work, this might be the fattest person they’ve ever drawn, their first dipping of a timid toe into new waters. And I never want to discourage that. And there’s more than one way to be fat.
But we are still often seeing a fairly narrow representation of fat people in the artwork that gets submitted, and it gives me pause to think of this blog being used to reinforce this narrow representation.
I want to encourage artists to stretch themselves in their subject matter. Go further than “slightly rounder.” Find references, do some studying, figure out the way fat really looks.
I find that there are fewer resources for drawing fat people than there are of thin people. Due to societal pressure, many fat people are unwilling to model, many photographers taking reference photos exclude fat people from the artistic conversation, and it can be very rude to approach someone unsolicited and say “Can I study your fat?” It’s part of why I started this blog in the first place. We can learn from each other’s art, techniques that are harder to find in the mainstream art world.
I wonder sometimes if I should start another tumblr looking for artistic resources of fat people. User submitted reference photos of fat people in various poses to be used for artistic study. There are other blogs showcasing wonderful arrays of various body types, but sometimes you need specific poses, closeups of a shoulder blade or an ankle, you know? Perhaps it’s time to make this happen.

I think this is relevant and important commentary given that this blog talks about body diversity in art, and how even when people are drawing big women, they still may be adhering strongly to a certain way society believes women should appear.
(Note: to clear up a misconception, I believe the posts are talking about how there’s a certain body type that is used constantly to depict big women, not that it’s “wrong”, but that it’s a narrow type and a restrictive standard.)

eschergirls:

fatpeopleart:

nepputune:

So I’ve seen a whole bunch of posts about body positivity. And it would be great, but they’re really bad at actually representing different body types; big girls in particular. So I’ve drawn a comparison.

I’m tired of seeing posts that totally miss the point. Those posts are supposed to make you feel good about your body. But it’s hard for bigger girls to feel good about themselves if they’re represented by women that aren’t big. Fat is okay. But here’s some things that people almost always ignore when drawing bigger ladies:

- Rolls

- Cellulite

- Stretch marks

And some misconceptions/ common mistakes:

- Larger breasts ( a LOT larger) 

- Wider hips

- Same size waist as girls with less body fat

I’m going to put it bluntly: I’m sick of seeing fatter girls be misrepresented. I’m tired of seeing posts getting glory for drawing bigger girls when they don’t. I have yet to see a body positivity post that shows cellulite, stretch marks, folds, and spillage. These things are real, and they’re beautiful.

So try and remember these things next time you try and represent fat girls. Because if you’re not thinking about the “ugly” stuff, you’re doing it wrong.

This is something I think a lot about when I moderate this blog. We get a lot of submissions depicting fat people who aren’t really… well, fat.

Fatter than what we see in a lot of art, sure. And I know for a lot of the artists submitting work, this might be the fattest person they’ve ever drawn, their first dipping of a timid toe into new waters. And I never want to discourage that. And there’s more than one way to be fat.

But we are still often seeing a fairly narrow representation of fat people in the artwork that gets submitted, and it gives me pause to think of this blog being used to reinforce this narrow representation.

I want to encourage artists to stretch themselves in their subject matter. Go further than “slightly rounder.” Find references, do some studying, figure out the way fat really looks.

I find that there are fewer resources for drawing fat people than there are of thin people. Due to societal pressure, many fat people are unwilling to model, many photographers taking reference photos exclude fat people from the artistic conversation, and it can be very rude to approach someone unsolicited and say “Can I study your fat?” It’s part of why I started this blog in the first place. We can learn from each other’s art, techniques that are harder to find in the mainstream art world.

I wonder sometimes if I should start another tumblr looking for artistic resources of fat people. User submitted reference photos of fat people in various poses to be used for artistic study. There are other blogs showcasing wonderful arrays of various body types, but sometimes you need specific poses, closeups of a shoulder blade or an ankle, you know? Perhaps it’s time to make this happen.

I think this is relevant and important commentary given that this blog talks about body diversity in art, and how even when people are drawing big women, they still may be adhering strongly to a certain way society believes women should appear.

(Note: to clear up a misconception, I believe the posts are talking about how there’s a certain body type that is used constantly to depict big women, not that it’s “wrong”, but that it’s a narrow type and a restrictive standard.)

…for the contingent out there who sneer at heroes like Superman and Wonder Woman and Captain America, those icons who still, at their core, represent selfless sacrifice for the greater good, and who justify their contempt by saying, oh, it’s so unrealistic, no one would ever be so noble… grow up. Seriously. Cynicism is not maturity, do not mistake the one for the other. If you truly cannot accept a story where someone does the right thing because it’s the right thing to do, that says far more about who you are than these characters.
Greg Rucka (via murmurandshout)

kellysue:

Y’all all saw this, right? 

Joe Mad, on Facebook: 

*Art Advice*

Do you really want to be an artist? Or a successful working professional?
Believe it or not there is a difference. I’m not usually a soapbox type guy, I don’t like instructing people, and I think I’m a terrible teacher. But hey, it’s Friday and I’m in a strange mood. So here goes:

I’ve noticed that a good number of my fans happen to be aspiring artists themselves. This is for all you guys. I get asked constantly: “Where should I go to school?” “What classes should I take?” “What should I study for anatomy?” “What pencils and paper do you use?” “Should I be working digitally now instead of traditionally?” “How do I fix my poses? Learn composition? Perspective?” “When am I going to develop my own style?” “Who were your influences?” “Teach me how to draw hands!” The list goes on…
Here’s the deal. All of that stuff *is* important, and it may nudge you in the right direction. A lot of it you will discover for yourself. What works best for one person doesn’t work for another. That’s the beauty of art. It’s personal. It’s discovery. DON’T WORRY ABOUT ALL THAT CRAP!

Instead I’m going to answer the questions that you *SHOULD* be asking, but aren’t. These are things that have only recently occurred to me, after doing this for 20+ years. These things seem so obvious, but apparently they elude a lot of people, because I am surprised at how many ridiculously talented artists are ‘failing’ professionally. Or just unhappy. The beauty of what I’m about to tell you is that it doesn’t matter what field you’re in or what your art style is. 

In no particular order:
1) Do what you love. If you are passionate about what you’re doing, it shows. If you’re having fun, it shows. If you’re bored, IT SHOWS. Some guys are able to work on stuff they have zero interest in, and still pull off great work, but I find that when I do this my motivation takes a huge hit. And Motivation is key. Money is not a great motivator. It’s temporary like everything else. And honestly, I’ve gotten paid the most money for some of the shittiest work I have ever done. That may sound awesome, but it’s not. And here’s why…

2) You MUST stay Excited and Motivated. Have you noticed that there are days you can’t draw a god damned thing? And some days you feel like you can draw anything? It’s 4am but you don’t notice because you are in the ZONE. Your hand is racing ahead of your mind and you can do no wrong?! Maybe it’s some new paper you got. Or a new program you’ve been wanting to try out. Or you just found some amazing shit on DeviantArt, or watched some movie that just makes you want to run straight to your board. This relates to the above because while it is possible to involve yourself in projects you aren’t excited about—maybe you need the cash, or think it will look good on your resume, whatever it is—it’s not going to last. You need to stay fresh. Expose yourself to new things. New techniques. You should be getting tired of your own shit on a fairly regular basis. Otherwise other people will. 

3) Check your Ego. If you think you’re the shit, you’re already doomed. You may be really, really good at what you do, but there’s someone better. Sorry. There’s always plenty to learn, even for us old dogs. So when I meet young upstarts who have this sense of entitlement, or a know-it-all attitude, I just have to laugh. Some of the biggest egos I’ve ever witnessed were from people who have accomplished the least. Meanwhile, most guys who are supremely talented AND successful, and have EARNED the RIGHT to have an ego and throw their weight around, don’t. Why is that? It’s because…

4) Relationships are important. This may be one of the biggest lessons I’ve had to learn. Early on, I didn’t value my relationships with people. Creatively or otherwise. I felt like I didn’t need anyone’s help and I could figure everything out on my own. Let’s face it, many of us become artists because we are reclusive, social misfits. We’d rather stay inside and draw shit than go outside and play. We like to live inside our own minds. Why not?! It’s awesome in there! And sometimes we don’t want to let other people in. But like I said—you can’t do it alone. I can honestly say that as much as I try to stay current, as much as I try to push my work and draw kick ass shit that will excite people, I would not be where I am today if it weren’t for all the other people I’ve met and learned from along the way. Guys who pulled strings for me. Took risks on me. Believed I was the right guy for the job. You need to manage your relationships. You need to network, and meet people. Drawing comics is still a pretty good place for reclusive types—but if you want to work in big studios—Making games, Films, animation, basically any other type of job on the planet, you’d better start making some connections. Be likeable. Be professional. That doesn’t mean be an opportunistic ladder climber. Fake people lose in the end. Be yourself, but be professional. It’s no secret that when people are hiring, our first instinct is to bring in people we know. It’s human nature. I don’t like unknowns, even if their portfolio is awesome. If we have a mutual connection, if they have great things to say about you, you’re in. If you have AMAZING artwork to show, and I call your last employer and they tell me what a pain in the ass you are to work with, you’re done. Talent and skill only get you so far. I am literally amazed at how often I meet guys that are total assholes and think they are going to get anywhere. 

5) Here’s the BIG ONE. The greatest obstacle you will ever have to overcome IS YOURSELF. And the Fear that you are creating in your own head. Stay positive. Stop defeating yourself. There are artists I know that are so damn good they make me pee my pants. I look up to these mofos. I study their shit and I want to draw like them. And they are almost NEVER working on their DREAM project. And—big surprise, they aren’t happy in their job. “Why NOT?! WTF is WRONG WITH YOU?!” is usually my reaction. And the answer is almost always “The market isn’t great right now” “Other stories/games/comics like mine don’t do very well” “The shit that’s hot right now is nothing like mine, It’s just going to fail.” “I’m not sure I’m good enough.” “I need the money.” “Too Risky.” “I tried it before and failed. ” It doesn’t matter what words they use, they are afraid for one reason or another. I know. I’ve been there. 


But here’s the deal. YOU NEED TO TAKE RISKS. Guess what? YOU ARE MOST LIKELY GOING TO FAIL. If you want it—REALLY want it, that won’t stop you. You will learn A LOT. My good friend Tim constantly jokes about how I jump out of planes without a parachute and worry about the landing on the way down. You may think that I’m lucky, that it’s easy for me to say because I’m already successful, that I’m in a different situation than you all are. But it’s not true. Risk is risk, no matter what level you’re at. If you’re already successful, you just take even bigger risks. But they never go away. Everything in life is Risk vs. Reward. Not just in your career. LIFE. You’d better get used to it.

I didn’t know what the hell I was doing when I got into comics. I left the #1 selling book at the time ( Uncanny X-men ) to work on Battle Chasers during a time when ‘Conan’ was about the only fantasy comic people knew. And no one was buying it. I wanted to work in games, so I started a game company. I had NO IDEA WTF I was doing. I just wanted it, really bad. We tanked. It failed. No big surprise. But the people I worked with got hired elsewhere and rehired me. I started ANOTHER game Company. We had 4 people and a dream, and some publishers wouldn’t even meet with us, because their ‘next gen console’ teams had 90+ people on them. I literally got hung up on. “Stick to handheld games, it’s smaller, maybe you can handle that…” one MAJOR publisher told us. I don’t blame them. But we didn’t let it stop us. Thank god we didn’t listen to them. Vigil was born. Darksiders happened, AND we got to make a sequel. It stands shoulder to shoulder with the best games in the industry, and the most elite and experienced game dev studios in the world. How is that possible?!!! Hardly any of us had even worked on a console game before. I’ll be honest, I was thinking we would fail the whole time. I just didn’t care. If I had to play the odds on this one, I’d bet against us. 

Why am I telling you all this shit? This is not me patting myself on the back. It’s just stuff that has somehow only dawned on me recently when it’s been staring me in the face for so long. I feel like I need to wake you guys up!!! I’ve been limiting myself. I’ve gotten afraid. I’ve taken less risks. I saw my career going places I didn’t want to go. I wasn’t happy and I wasn’t excited. And I’ve realized, that all that stuff I just talked about is the reason I am where I am today. Not because I have a manga style, or I draw cool hands, or there’s energy in my drawings, or all the other things people rattle off to me. There are other guys that do all that same shit, and do it better. And amazingly, those same guys constantly tell me “Man, I wish I could do what you are doing.” “SO DO IT!!!!!” PLEASE listen to me—because I want you guys to make it. I want to look to one of you people for inspiration some day when it’s 2am and I need to keep drawing. Stop worrying about all the other stuff—the pencils, the paper, the anatomy, all that shit. It will only get you so far. You’ve already got most of what you need. I hope this helps some people. From the bottom of my heart, thank you for all the support over the years. You are all one of the greatest motivating forces in my life and my career. Sappy but true. Ok, let’s go draw some shit!!!

In the terrific documentary Casting By, now playing on HBO, Director Richard Donner talks about how he cast Lethal Weapon. He worked with legendary casting director Marion Dougherty, who helped him settle first on Mel Gibson. When she suggested Danny Glover for the other lead, Donner said “but he’s black.” And Dougherty said, basically, so what?

In the documentary, Donner is speaking before an audience and they laugh initially at the anecdote (emphasis added). He cuts off the laughter and continues, saying having Dougherty challenge him was “like a nail to my heart.” He didn’t realize his own bias, his own prejudice in not seeing Glover in the role. If a role didn’t specifically call for an African-American, he didn’t see it. The realization led, of course, to the casting of Glover, who fit the role of Murtaugh perfectly. Donner said it also changed his life because it opened his eyes to how prejudiced he had been.

ormessociety:

From Josie and the Pussycats, meet Valerie Smith! I’ll let Wikipedia do the work…

A headstrong African-American young lady, Valerie performs back-up vocals (in the comics and the movie) and occasionally sings lead (nearly always in the TV series) for the Pussycats. She is also the group’s main songwriter. In the comics, she plays the bass; in the cartoons, she plays tambourine. She is the character who saves the day the most often, thanks to her street smarts and her mechanical and scientific genius. Valerie is notable as the first African-American cartoon character on a regular animated television series.

Here’s an interesting tidbit about the cartoon version of the character, voiced by the late and great Patrice Holloway…

In 1970, [Patrice Holloway] auditioned for producer Danny Janssen, winning the part of Valerie Brown in Josie and the Pussycats, alongside Cathy Daugher (Josie) and Cheryl Ladd as ditzy drummer Melody. Patrice therefore had the distinction of being the first African-American to voice the first African-American regular series character on cartoon TV. However, William Hanna and Joseph Barbera balked at Patrice’s involvement, demanding she be recast and that Valerie become Caucasian. It’s worth noting that, in the original comic, Valerie was always intended to be African-American.

Janssen refused to back down, resulting in a 3-week standoff between the producer and Hanna-Barbera. H-B finally relented, allowing Janssen to keep Patrice in the show, and keeping her character African-American.

anonj-the-writress:

skinnykate:

justonebreathatatime:

omfg that FACE

Too funny and horribly true not to reblog a million times

THIS IS ACCURATE AS HELL OH MY GOD

kwerey:

This post about the Hawkeye Initiative really sums up a lot of half-thoughts I’d had about it and makes them coherent:

If the costumes/poses are ridiculous and impractical, they’re ridiculous and impractical regardless of what kind of body is placed in them. The idea that male bodies…